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September 10, 2008

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millicent

Just goes to show that you never know what people are dealing with by the way they look.

Lene

I've used a wheelchair for 30 years, so am not terribly invisible, but have been interested in the dichotomy of issues with visible vs invisible disabilities/conditions for a long time. And yes, you're right - it does help when asking for help when you're in a chair, people don't look at you as if you're lazy or somehow perpetuating a fraud. However, that thing about being comfortable asking for help? I'm still working on it and regularly screwing up my body because, in the words of my toddler niece and nephew, "me do it!!'. Sigh.

One good thing about the chair, though, is that when I bang into people (mostly accidentally), they apologize. But that could also be a Canadian thing. ;)

Sara

Hi Lene,

I think you might have a point there about the Canadian/American difference :) It's true-the 'me do it' instinct is sooo strong. Even with simple things I know others wouldn't mind doing for me, i don't want to *have* to ask them or have them do it for me. from what you say, i'm guessing it doesn't get all that much better with time. i guess it is a practice, like so many other things. Thanks for your comment.

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